Discourse on the Origin and the Foundations of Inequality Among Men (unabridged)

Audio Sample

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Discourse on the Origin and the Foundations of Inequality Among Men

Read by Neville Jason

unabridged

Rousseau’s Discourse sets out to explore the origin of inequality among people, a journey that sees him trace the evolution of humans from the savage man to the foundations of civil society. With verve and passion, the philosopher argues that the birth of private property was the ‘beginning of evil’. Throughout the book we are led to consider the progress of language, reason, self-preservation, benevolence, pity and law – all through the lens of perhaps the most original thinker of the eighteenth century.

  • 5 CDs

    Running Time: 5 h 53 m

    More product details
    ISBN:978-184-379-904-7
    Digital ISBN:978-184-379-905-4
    Cat. no.:NA0205
    CD RRP: $34.98 USD
    Download size:91 MB
  • Buy Download £ 13.00
    Buy Download € 12.08 + VAT
    Buy Download $ 23.00 USD
    Buy Download £ 10.83 GBP

    See Download Shop – How It Works

    IMPORTANT!

    Downloading on a mobile device?

    Currently, restrictions on the delivery of files to mobile devices mean our download titles must be downloaded to a desktop computer and then transferred to the mobile device.

    Download links are also delivered to you via e-mail: see Download Shop – How It Works for more details.

    Buy on CD at NaxosDirect.com

Due to copyright, this title is not currently available in your region.

You May Also Enjoy
Reviews

Rousseau’s early essay on the origins of man and society – using biology, anthropology and linguistics – is now mostly of historical interest, but Neville Jason’s skilled reading helps keep it enjoyable. His pleasant voice, distinguished-sounding accent, and somewhat rolling style – at the same time precise and conversational, intellectual but easygoing – matches Rousseau’s essayistic manner. Jason avoids becoming ponderous, moving the text fluidly but at a measured pace, which is helpful for the listener who is grappling with the ideas. He clearly understands what he’s reading and is able to give phrases and sentences their proper intonation and emphasis, which also aids the listener’s understanding. Audio may not seem the obvious choice for philosophy, but Jason’s narration makes it work.

W.M., AudioFile


Recently viewed

See more Philosophy

NAB Articles