after the quake (unabridged)

Audio Sample

Haruki Murakami

after the quake

UFU in Kushiro | Landscape with Flatiron | All God’s Children Can Dance | Thailand | Superfrog Saves Tokyo | Honey Pie

Read by Rupert Degas, Teresa Gallagher & Adam Sims

unabridged

In 1995, the Japanese city of Kobe suffered a massive earthquake. Nearly 6,000 people died. after the quake was the imaginative response from Japan’s leading novelist, Haruki Murakami: six stories, each dealing not directly with the catastrophe but the wider seismic effect it had on the emotional lives of people many miles away. It became a catalyst for individuals to reassess their lives with unexpected consequences for themselves and their families and friends around them. after the quake is Murakami’s most popular short story collection.

  • 4 CDs

    Running Time: 4 h 20 m

    More product details
    ISBN:978-962-634-432-3
    Digital ISBN:978-962-954-622-9
    Cat. no.:NA443212
    CD RRP: $28.98 USD
    Download size:63 MB
    BISAC:FIC029000
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Podcast
Included in this title
  • UFO in Kushiro
  • Landscape with Flatiron
  • All God’s Children Can Dance
  • Thailand
  • Superfrog Saves Tokyo
  • Honey Pie 1
  • Honey Pie 2

Reviews

The connection with the 1995 Kobe earthquake in these six unabridged stories is curiously nebulous, but it keys with their uncomfortable sense of dislocation. Junpei, like Murakami, broke away from his parents long ago and doesn’t call them after the quake; Yoshiya’s mother insists he is a son of God, but on a train, he pursues a man he believes to be his father. Relationships are intense but ultimately unfulfilling, and obsessions, like Junko’s with building beach fires, are all-absorbing but purposeless. The narrators succeed in conveying the striking, vibrant reality of these worlds and their aimless, intriguing weirdness.

Rachel Redford, The Observer


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